Amla is a sour fruit from the Phyllanthus emblica tree which is native to India but grows throughout southeast Asia.  Amla is rich in Vitamin C, anti-oxidants and fiber which has made it a popular dietary supplement.  Amla is used extensively in Ayruvedic medicine for a variety of conditions from constipation to prevent graying of the hair.  For beauty Amla oil is best known for it’s effect on stimulating hair growth, and since it’s still relatively undiscovered it is less expensive than the very popular Argan (is it possible for an ingredient to be over-exposed?).

While checking out ingredients for a class I found Amla in powder form.  Since the fruit is rich in vitamin C I knew it could be helpful for cleansing oily and congested skin.  The powder makes it perfect for using as a scrub.

Loved it!
When used in scrubs the amla powder leaves behind skin that is soft but also has the refreshed look and feel that comes from a deep clean.  It worked very well even when blended with just water.  Texturally it’s finer than oatmeal, cornmeal, or almond powder which means slightly better coverage and exfoliation while still being fairly gentle.  Unfortunately because amla is so astringent it could easily cause irritation for people with sensitive skin.  An amla powder scrub seems like a great option for those who need to balance out clogged pores, oily skin, or acne prone skin.  For other skin types it may be useful as part of a monthly facial or occasional deep cleansing scrub.  If you have sensitive skin or want to use amla everyday I would advise you to blend it with ground oatmeal.

How to use:  

Take 1tsp of Amla Powder and make a wet paste using any of the following:   Water, coconut milk, almond milk, aloe vera gel, lavender or chamomile hydrosol, cooled herbal tea.

Moisten skin with warm water, gently massage the powder mixture over the face and neck in a circular motion.  Rinse thoroughly and follow with toner and moisturizer if desired.  Amla powder can also be used to make a gently exfoliating body scrub and may be helpful for areas that have scars and stretch marks.   Always remember to test ingredients first.

 Dry amla powder has a faint jammy-berry scent which doesn’t translate when it gets wet.  The scent of the paste reminded me of liquid multi-vitamins.

Okay everybody, enjoy using Amla and let me know if you make anything interesting.  Thanks so much for reading.

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